Annapolis Landscape Design
24 Nutwell Rd, Lothian,
MD, 20711
Mon-Fri: 7am-4pm
26 Oct 2016
Garden

6 Must-Dos in Your Garden this Fall

After a wonderful September, fall is finally in the air.  There is a chill at night, the sky looks different and the garden is coming to a halt for the season.  It is easy to begin to look towards other projects around the house, but do not neglect your prized outdoor space. Just as gardens are opened up for business in the spring, they need to be closed down in the fall.

The following 6 tips are must dos in your garden this fall:

  1. Cut Back, Divide, and Replant your Favorite Perennials.
    • Serious spring gardeners know this work done will pay high dividends in the spring. If you’re perennial garden has not been divided in the past 4-5 years or ever, now is the best time to maximize your investment after a high growing season due to all the rain.
  2. Take Soil Samples.
    • Is the color of your garden as rich and vibrant as you imagined? Your soil may be depleted of the essential nutrients that produce the color and growth you envision. Whether it is your vegetable, small fruit or flower garden, it is important to take the appropriate soil samples. One of our professionals can take a proper soil sample and have it analysed by a reputable lab that will provide a detailed analysis of what to do next.
  3. Fertilize.
    • Applications of slow release fertilizers will work into the soil profile. Here, the roots are growing and storing essential nutrients for early spring growth. An organic slow release nutrient will work with the natural soil biological organisms to enhance the growth potential in your favorite garden flower beds next year.
  4. Insecticide Applications.
    • Azalea, Rhododendron, Pieris, Cotoneaster, and Amelanchier are fantastic early spring bloomers that require special attention now. Susceptible to the Lacebug insect, this insect uses its piercing-sucking mouth to suck sugars throughout the summer leaving a whitish stippling cast to the leaves. Plants in full sun are prominently more affected than those in shaded areas. Treatment this fall can protect your investment for up to 2 years. Make applications that will result in enhanced color and performance on these favorite spring bloomers.
  5. Stop Overwintering.
    • Fall is a critical time to inspect small shrubs and trees for scale insects. Indian Wax Scale, Magnolia Scale and Hemispherical Scale are prevalent now. Mature females are protecting eggs underneath her coverings. Treatment now can interfere with overwintering of the young and allocate essential within the plant the systemic pesticide activity to protect growth next year.
  6. Boxwood Damage Control.
    • English Boxwood is a favorite among gardeners. Unfortunately, the insect Boxwood Leafminer Larvae has probably already infected your plant. Eggs laid in June are developing into larvae that are eating the interior layers of the plant leaf cells producing a blistering, off-yellow color look. Treatment this fall is critical in control to kill larvae that will feed through the winter into early spring. Adults hatch in May/June in the Maryland area, which can be reduced by a fall application of Imidacloprid soil insecticide now.

Still yearning to spend time outdoors?? If so, we would suggest the installation of a patio and fire pit. We believe there is no better way to spend cool fall evenings than beside a fire! So, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at 410-956-1344! We would love to meet with you and discuss some great ideas for your outdoor living spaces!

By: Corey Childs, Business Development

08 Sep 2016
Shade Garden Plant

So How Do You Garden in the Shade?

As you look around your landscape to decide which areas to focus on this fall, don’t neglect the shady spots.  Although planting in the shade can be challenging, shade gardens can add color, depth, and beauty to your landscape.

Shade gardening requires one to forgo some of the traditional garden elements, such as sun-loving perennial flowers, in favor of focusing on variations in texture, structure, and foliage color.  In addition, you must pick plants that can survive the conditions and use different planting techniques.  Fortunately, there are many options.  Here are a few things to keep in mind as you design:

Plant Layers:

A dynamic shade garden includes at least two—and usually more—layers of plants.  For example, a background layer may include 5 large Oak leaf Hydrangeas (Hydrangea q.), a middle layer could consist of 9 Fothergilla shrubs, and a front layer may consist of 13 Japanese Fountain Grass (Hakone), 13 Hellebore, and 13 Coral Bells (Heuchera).

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Dense Plant:

Use large quantities for the most part and plant them slightly closer than the tag directions call for.  Since plants in the shade tend to grow slowly, close planting will not only create a lush garden look, but also help to shade out weeds, cutting down on garden maintenance and competition.

Add Structure:

With all those plants and textures filling up your shade garden, it is wise to consider adding a structure to give the space a focus and allow the eye to rest.  This can be a large container, fountain, sculpture, or other man-made object, but it can also be a large shrub or small tree with good strong lines such as a Dogwood (Cornus fl.), Redbud (Cercis c.), or Witch Hazel (Hamamelis).

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If you would like your shade gardens to be professionally designed by Exterior Image, contact us today for a free consultation!

Happy Gardening!!