Annapolis Landscape Design
24 Nutwell Rd, Lothian,
MD, 20711
Mon-Fri: 7am-4pm
26 Oct 2016
Garden

6 Must-Dos in Your Garden this Fall

After a wonderful September, fall is finally in the air.  There is a chill at night, the sky looks different and the garden is coming to a halt for the season.  It is easy to begin to look towards other projects around the house, but do not neglect your prized outdoor space. Just as gardens are opened up for business in the spring, they need to be closed down in the fall.

The following 6 tips are must dos in your garden this fall:

  1. Cut Back, Divide, and Replant your Favorite Perennials.
    • Serious spring gardeners know this work done will pay high dividends in the spring. If you’re perennial garden has not been divided in the past 4-5 years or ever, now is the best time to maximize your investment after a high growing season due to all the rain.
  2. Take Soil Samples.
    • Is the color of your garden as rich and vibrant as you imagined? Your soil may be depleted of the essential nutrients that produce the color and growth you envision. Whether it is your vegetable, small fruit or flower garden, it is important to take the appropriate soil samples. One of our professionals can take a proper soil sample and have it analysed by a reputable lab that will provide a detailed analysis of what to do next.
  3. Fertilize.
    • Applications of slow release fertilizers will work into the soil profile. Here, the roots are growing and storing essential nutrients for early spring growth. An organic slow release nutrient will work with the natural soil biological organisms to enhance the growth potential in your favorite garden flower beds next year.
  4. Insecticide Applications.
    • Azalea, Rhododendron, Pieris, Cotoneaster, and Amelanchier are fantastic early spring bloomers that require special attention now. Susceptible to the Lacebug insect, this insect uses its piercing-sucking mouth to suck sugars throughout the summer leaving a whitish stippling cast to the leaves. Plants in full sun are prominently more affected than those in shaded areas. Treatment this fall can protect your investment for up to 2 years. Make applications that will result in enhanced color and performance on these favorite spring bloomers.
  5. Stop Overwintering.
    • Fall is a critical time to inspect small shrubs and trees for scale insects. Indian Wax Scale, Magnolia Scale and Hemispherical Scale are prevalent now. Mature females are protecting eggs underneath her coverings. Treatment now can interfere with overwintering of the young and allocate essential within the plant the systemic pesticide activity to protect growth next year.
  6. Boxwood Damage Control.
    • English Boxwood is a favorite among gardeners. Unfortunately, the insect Boxwood Leafminer Larvae has probably already infected your plant. Eggs laid in June are developing into larvae that are eating the interior layers of the plant leaf cells producing a blistering, off-yellow color look. Treatment this fall is critical in control to kill larvae that will feed through the winter into early spring. Adults hatch in May/June in the Maryland area, which can be reduced by a fall application of Imidacloprid soil insecticide now.

Still yearning to spend time outdoors?? If so, we would suggest the installation of a patio and fire pit. We believe there is no better way to spend cool fall evenings than beside a fire! So, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at 410-956-1344! We would love to meet with you and discuss some great ideas for your outdoor living spaces!

By: Corey Childs, Business Development

09 Jun 2016
Rain Garden from Blog Post

What’s a Rain Garden?

Wow! Exterior Image’s rain garden was certainly put to the test in May! Installed in 2008, our 800 square foot rain garden has grown to a mature state and is thriving in it’s environment. As the garden has matured, it continues to do it’s job time and time again. (See how it’s grown in the photos below).

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What’s a rain garden? Well, a rain garden is a sunken garden that receives water runoff from a roof, driveway, walkways and other impervious areas. Instead of having all this water sent to the bay carrying all the pollutants, salts, waste, etc., have that water retained on your property and allow it to enter the groundwater system which naturally filters out the dangerous pollutants that infiltrate our bay and tributaries.

To see various garden designs, click here.

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Exterior Image used a host of wetland edge vegetation for the job. Most of these plants are native because they generally don’t require fertilizer, and are tolerant of existing climate, soils, and water conditions. The plants will also help absorb excess moisture before returning into the soil.

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If you would like to install a rain garden to help in the preservation of the Chesapeake Bay, and our environment, give us a call at 410-956-1344 to schedule a consultation and design. We will then price your job for a professional installation that will not fail in its task of preserving our natural resources.

Some plants we use in rain gardens:

Rain Garden Plant Selection

Perennials: Aster novae-angliae- New England Aster; Baptisa australis – False Indigo; Carex muskingunmensis – Palm Sedge; Eupatorium maculatum- Joe Pye Weed; Hibiscus moscheutos – Swamp Mallow (Hibiscus); Iris pseudacorus – Yellow Flag Iris; Iris ensata – Japanese Iris; Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida – Black Eyed Susan; Solidago rugosa

Shrubs: Itea virginica – Virginia Sweetspire; Cornus sericea –Redosier Dogwood

See more local natives on our Trent Hill Nursery website

23 May 2016
XW3S6364

The Pros & Cons of the Crazy Weather

What effect does all the recent cool, wet and cloudy weather have on the landscape? How do plants react to that? In general, you would expect a slowing of growth and development. Flowers may be delayed. Size may be less than normal. The good news is that these effects will be mitigated by the abundance of rain. More good news is those plants and trees in flower have retained them much longer than normal. In the nursery our hybrid and Kousa dogwoods, as well as some viburnum, still are in bloom.

You can expect more fungal disease due to the cool and damp. We have seen cedar apple rust and cedar quince rust. Molds and mildew might also appear.

Insect development and activity is also retarded. You may have noticed the absence of gnats—a real treat. Insects that carry disease, like the ambrosia beetle, have been less actively flying and thereby not spreading disease. The same applies to lilac borers.

Seasonal affective disorder notwithstanding, be grateful for all the moisture and coolness. It will soon be hot and dry.